Secondary Fermentation - How To Keep Kegs And Bottles Cool?

Darren

Site Administrator
Staff member
#1
Well summer is mostly here with temperatures cracking 40 degrees over the next few days (BOM never get it right) so how are you keeping your kegs or bottles in secondary fermentation in the range of the suggest 18 - 25 degrees?

I must say only just gone 11am and already hitting 25+ degrees inside.

Now there's a new idea for the BrewArt guys, a device to put our kegs / bottles purely for secondary fermentation :) A fridge of some description with a digital thermostat, wouldn't be that difficult actually.

Cheers
Darren
 

Deeks

BrewArt Rookie
#2
I've been storing my keeps in the bottom shelf in the pantry which is a walk in style and it seems quite cool and dark in there. Not sure what the temperature is in there tho but I don't think it is too bad.

Not sure if I would go down the path of temperature control for secondary fermentation as I'm not to keen to have to buy extra equipment and I am not sure if it would be worth it.

Will be interesting to hear from someone that does this and the difference it makes to the beer.
 

Darren

Site Administrator
Staff member
#3
Pantry is certainly a good option that's for sure, the air con has decided to crap itself just when we have some hot weather coming through, got a couple of split system units going which should at least drop the temp down from the crazy 32 degrees inside.

More room and more expense required.

Keeping it at a constant temperature I reckon would benefit it however no proof to back that up, never really did look into it.
 

GMoney

BrewArt Rookie
#4
I bought a temperature controller and am using an old freezer to keep it at temperature. It is working great! The controllers can be bought on ebay for around $20 delivered so I thought this was a worthwhile investment.
 

Darren

Site Administrator
Staff member
#5
Thanks for that, I do have a spare fridge which is a bit worse for wear, this could potentially be used as a secondary fermentation device if required. I did have a fridgemate temperature controller setup on another fridge but that's cactus now.

Just a matter of working out whether it would be really worth it, not sure how critical or whether it would be best to keep the brew at an ideal temperature for the duration before heading into the BrewFlo.

Only summer months that the issue will be about but certainly not alone no matter what part of Australia we live in.
 

GMoney

BrewArt Rookie
#6
The freezer was just sitting there and hasn't been in use for a long time. Unfortunately the only viable place I could keep the kegs was around 26 degrees and although that wouldn't be the end of the world utilizing the freezer space made sense. So far so good as well. I sanitized a used coke bottle, primed with just sugar and placed the dregs that wouldn't fit in the keg as a test to see how long carbonating would take as well as to see how clear the brew would turn out and so far I'm happy with how it has gone.
 

Deeks

BrewArt Rookie
#7
That sounds like a good setup and fairly cheap to do if you have a spare old fridge or freezer not being used.
Will be interesting to see how it turns out and if it improves the conditioning of the beer as to whether it is worth doing.
Are you going to compare a temperature controlled to a non-temperature controlled conditioned beer?
 

GMoney

BrewArt Rookie
#8
Hey Deeks,

The plan is to start going half/half with the brews into kegs and bottles once I've got enough kegs to take to a holiday house we rent every year, and that is only 6 weeks away so I'm pushing hard to help supply the house. Once I do this there probably won't be enough room in the freezer anyway so some bottles will live in the pantry and this will give me an idea.

Will be sure to let you know the result.
 

Shano

BrewArt Rookie
#9
Would be interested in seeing the difference GMoney. Sitting around 34 - 35 in Cairns at the moment with shocking humidity. I have only just kegged my first brew and I am hoping the high temps don't affect the secondary fermentation to much.
 

Darren

Site Administrator
Staff member
#10
I was worried about the American Pale Ale I just finished Friday night which saw some huge variances in temperatures due to a air con issue but all in all if temps do make a difference I certainly didn't notice it.

Inside for a couple of days before the air con magically fixed itself it was a smidge over 30 degrees inside, I guess it would take a fair bit to warm up the inside to a point of effecting the brew.

The same thing could be said you look at the weather being experienced all over the country of late, our BrewPrints sitting in a warehouse for days, sitting in non air conditioned trucks moving from state to state or cars upon delivery, they would see some pretty big temperature ranges and one would expect not good temperatures either.

One thing you could try if you know the temps are really high wrap a damp tea towel around the keg, should be enough to at least cool it down ever so slightly.
 

Shano

BrewArt Rookie
#11
Thats a good point Darren, might have to give the wet towels a go. I thiught about air con but didn't want to run it 24x7 just for beer.
 

Shano

BrewArt Rookie
#12
Thats a good point Darren, might have to give the wet towels a go. I thought about air con but didn't want to run it 24x7 just for beer.
 

Darren

Site Administrator
Staff member
#13
Can certainly appreciate that one.

I'm leaning towards the yeast and what not is a little more forgiving that we think.

But having said that, sticking with the recommended is the best way to get decent results I'm sure.